Thunder Bay Police state that city police officers, First Nations constables, and animal welfare inspectors can enter a vehicle to search for animals in critical distress.

THUNDER BAY – The average summer temperature for May, June & July is between 19 and 23 degrees.

For the average adult, that could be called a perfect temperature. However, once inside a metal box with glass windows, that opinion might change quickly as the temperature starts to rise, especially for a dog.

The No Hot Pets campaign from the OSPCA has launched for the season. Focusing on educating pet owners and those wishing to help, the campaign wants the public to know when it’s safe to leave an animal in a car during the summer.

Owners are being reminded that even in cars parked in the shade with windows open, the temps inside a car can rise quickly. It even addresses “dog mode” with a Tesla: “If you can’t take your animal with you, leave them at home where they are safe. If your car malfunctions while you are away, it could quickly reach deadly temperatures, putting your furry friend’s life at risk.”

Thunder Bay Police state that city police officers, First Nations constables, and animal welfare inspectors can enter a vehicle to search for animals in critical distress, “Section 29 permits such entry and search where a police officer, First Nations Constable, and/or animal the welfare inspector has reasonable grounds to believe that an animal is in critical distress.”

More information on the No Hot Pets campaign is available here.

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